Michigan Green Card for Spouse Immigration Attorneys

Family-based immigration allows U.S. citizens to help their spouses (and their minor children), minor children, and parents obtain green cards. Unlike other types of immigrant visas, being obtained by immigrants, there are no quotas or cut-offs concerning how many people may can obtain lawful permanent residency ("LPR" or a green card) through this method.

In order to obtain a green card for a spouse, there are certain requirements which must be met. There is complex paperwork, which must be prepared completely and accurately. Since 1982, the law firm of Richard W. Pierce, P.C., has been helping spouses obtain green cards by making sure every single aspect of their petition and other documentation is completed timely and precisely. Contact us to arrange a confidential appointment if you have a spouse that is seeking a green card.

Helping Your Spouse Obtain a Green Card

If you are seeking a green card for a spouse through this type of family-based immigration route, you do not need to be present in the United States to start this process. You do need to prove that your marriage was made in good faith and not just a green card marriage for the sole for the purpose of helping someone to obtain a green card. In addition to filing necessary documents, if the spouse is already in the U.S., you will have a joint in-person interview to adjust their immigration status. Adjustment allows the spouse to obtain the green card while remaining in the U.S. If the spouse is in the U.S, when the case is filed, the interview will usually take place within several months of your petition being submitted. If the spouse will process at a U.S. consulate overseas, normally that foreign spouse in the only person interviewed.

There are certain factors that likely will make a person you ineligible to receive the green card (or, if processing at a U.S. consulate overseas, the immigrant visa) and they include:

  • The foreign spouse ever having claimed to be a citizen of the United States when, in fact, that is not true
  • The spouse ever having voted in any type of election in the United States before becoming a citizen
  • The spouse having a criminal record that includes a conviction for what is called "crimes involving moral turpitude" (CIMT). (However, not all CIMT crimes will automatically prevent you from being granted a green card; any criminal background must be disclosed to and discussed with the attorney.)
  • The citizen cannot sponsor a spouse or others if he or she has been convicted of certain types of crimes.

It is also important to note that if the applying spouse is not otherwise ineligible, he or she will be approved for a green card. Under current immigration law, The U.S. Petitioner (U.S. citizen spouse) will also need to file an affidavit of support showing he or she will be able to financially support the foreign spouse. If the foreign spouse has any children under 21 who wish to obtain a green card, the U.S. Petitioner must file separate cases for each of them.

Assisting You With All Aspects of the Green Card Application Process

If the foreign spouse is already in the U.S. when the case is filed, most often he or she will be prohibited from traveling outside the U.S. until he or she obtains the green card unless the person has obtained specific permission from the Citizenship and Immigration Service ("CIS") to travel (what is called "advance parole"). Our lawyer can help you apply for advanced parole at the time of filing (or emergency parole if you meet the necessary conditions). After the case has been filed, it may be possible to file for a U.S. Social Security Number and Card.

We are also here to help you with any work-related or other issues that are associated with your green card application. We are also able to assist with U.S. citizenship if, after being married for and having had the green card for three years, he foreign spouse decides to pursue naturalization. Contact us today to schedule an appointment to see how we can help you or your spouse obtain a green card.